Grandad’s Island

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by Benji Davies (first published in the US by Candlewick, 2016)

This is a book about a boy named Syd. And if you go through the backyard and past the knotty tree, this is a book about Syd’s Grandad.

He’s a Grandad who has a big metal door in the corner of his attic. A metal door that leads to the deck of a very tall ship. A ship that steers on choppy seas to an island. An island where Grandad leaves his walking stick behind.

That’s the thing with this book. We see the heartache coming. We feel the loss inevitable. And yet, even if you experience this story fresh in life, far from loss—it’s still a lovely sentiment about the way we carry people in our hearts.

It’s beautiful.

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These two—white hair under a smile, red hair curled on top—read like the bookends of a life well lived and well loved. I love this small but might design detail in these characters. Very subtly but with a sophisticated sleight of hand, Benji Davies gives us a life cycle.

A legacy.

A now and then and now again.

It’s sweeping in scope, and something Benji Davies does so well is frame his pictures to match. Full bleed illustrations are few and far between, but the scenes he chooses to extend to the pages’ edges are the ones that need the most room to hold their riches.

It’s their home, their shared backyard.

It’s the ship, docked and hopeful.

It’s the island, ready and waiting.

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It’s the wonders of it all.

It’s the goodbye.

It’s a hello.

Check it out. You’ll see what I mean.

And like any Candlewick book, it’s printed on gloriously heavy paper and pages that smell like the best kind of story. Always.

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GRANDAD’S ISLAND. Copyright (c) 2015 by Benji Davies. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA.

Be Glad Your Dad…(Is Not an Octopus!) + An Interview with Sara Jensen

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by Matthew Logelin and Sara Jensen; illustrated by Jared Chapman (Little, Brown, 2016)

Once upon a time, I started this blog. It worked fine and looked nice until it didn’t anymore, and that’s when a superhero named Sara Jensen came to the rescue of this damsel in distress. She’s the genius behind the Book Party (seriously, click it), has the most heart-able Instagram feed out there, and is an extraordinary human with a huge, huge heart.

And then she told me she also wrote a book for kids.

I’ve been looking forward to it ever since.

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Dads. Endearing and embarrassing. Equal parts hilarious and heartfelt, which is exactly what this book is all about.

So while most of the time you’re glad your dad is your dad, let’s not forget there are times when he is a grouch and a grump and a total groaner. But even then, at least he’s not a dog who’d lick your face to say hello.

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The text is sharp and funny and allows for scene after outlandish scene to unfold. Each spread is an entire act by itself–vignettes set with understated props that balance the highly expressive characters. All of this action is wham-bammed in front of a brightly lit backdrop, perfectly setting the scene.

This kid’s hopes for a cool dad, melted away with the drips of that cone itself. Can’t you see it in both of their eyes?

Like we said. Dads.

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And at the end, a closer look at these oddball animals and the facts that make them everything you’re glad your dad is not. Pick up this one along with Pink is for Blobfish, and you’re set for a storytime celebrating all of your favorite wonderful, weirdo animals.

Fun, right?

I asked Sara a little more about this book, and I’m so happy to welcome her out from behind the scenes of this blog. Meet Sara Jensen, friends!

CH: How did this book happen?

SJ: It’s funny, I have never ever thought of myself as a writer and I am not sure I even do now. This book was written with my good friend Matt Logelin, who had previously published a memoir called Two Kisses For Maddy. From the moment Matt and I met, we realized that we for sure had the same style of parenting/talking to our children. We also for sure had some cocktails involved.

Late at night at a bar in my small island town we talked about how our kids didn’t think that we were very cool. I am the QUEEN of the “would you rather game”, where you force somebody to make a choice between two awful things. We started thinking about a G-rated version of it, where we’d ask our kids if they’d rather have us as parents or some kind of obnoxious animal. The ideas came fast and furious after that until we’d filled up dozens of notecards.

It helped that Matt had written a grownup book before too. We also had amazing editors at Little, Brown who helped us every step of the way.

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CH: Do you have plans to write more books for kids?

SJ: I’d love to write another children’s book with Matt. Matt and I have such an easy time bouncing ideas off of each other. We think in the same way enough to make it pleasurable but are also different enough to give each other a hard time. We both love our kids so much and are so inspired by them.

I’m just now realizing that all three of our kids have lived through very intense early lives: Maddy with the loss of her mother the day after she was born, Rose being adopted from foster care, and Henry with an early diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes. Despite all of this they have tremendous hearts, are super sharp, and are so insanely hilarious. Way cooler than Matt and I will ever be and they are only 8 years old.

CH: What did you and Matthew think when you first saw Jared’s illustrations?

SJ: Oh, it took a while to find the right illustrator. We saw a lot of work by so many talented people. The moment we saw Jared’s work we both got so excited. I think that we tried to be kind of cool about it, but Im pretty sure my reply had several exclamation marks and that Matt’s voice cracked he was so happy. Jared is so funny and had a big beard, which Matt and I both value a lot. I’m working on my beard right now, I feel a little left out. Illustration is SO critical to making or breaking a book. We are so thankful for Jared. Jared has been sharing his concept sketches of BGYD on his Instagram, its so amazing to see the process.

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CH: What books are your kids loving right now? And related: what book do you remember the best from growing up? And is it still something you think about now?

SJ: Currently Henry is reading the Edible Selby, Serengeti (a book about Africa), some fish guide about reef fish that a professor of Marine Biology lent him when we went to their house for dinner. His favorite baby books were New Socks (he would CRY to make read that book over and over) and The Little Island.

Rose is currently reading Wonder, Sisters Grimm, and Harriet the Spy. Her favorite younger book (we met Rose when she was 3) is Rosie Revere, Engineer.

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CH: What’s your favorite piece of art in your house?

SJ: We have a lot of old artwork in our house. Lots of photographs, old French cartoons that had been my grandfather’s. I also love American and Mexican retablos. I love buying weird little paintings off of people on the street. We have a tiny nude that is in our bathroom, I can’t really explain why I love it, I just do.

I also have this piece that Rosie made of Henry sitting on the toilet. She had worked on a “kindness quilt” at school, each child had to illustrate an act of kindness they had showed another person.

When I walked by it in the hallway at school I laughed so hard. It was her brother sitting on the toilet, and it said “I Pote trand my brother when i was littl.” I potty trained my brother when I was little. It’s so funny to me still, and totally true. They are two months apart and she got him out of diapers within a week of moving in with us. She is amazing.

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CH: What else should we know about you?

SJ: I am a very involved in the Type 1 diabetes community as a result of my son’s diagnosis at age 5. I am the creative director and a council member of Beyond Type 1, a nonprofit that works to raise awareness and fund an eventual cure.

I am also the creative director for interior designer and TV host Genevieve Gorder. She is so great to work with and so supportive of my outside interests, I’m so lucky to know her.

I am working on a side project in honor of Rose too, it will have to do with foster care and she and I are still working on the specifics.

CH: What sort of story influences do you have as a designer?

SJ: Even thought I insist I am not a writer I have always been a storyteller. Both of my parents were. I also love the idea of being able to tell a story with only pictures, letting the reader realize the words, and the idea of having a story just written and having the reader think of the imagery.

I have a major problem with seeing movies based on books. I’m always worried that they won’t honor the parts of the book that were so important to me.

Because my husband is a graphic novelist I have grown to really like some of them, I wouldn’t say that I am a fan but I loved the Buddha series by Osamu Tezuka and recently a heartbreaking book called Rosalie Lightning written by our friend Tom Hart about the loss of his child.

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Thank you, Sara! (She’s pretty great, right?)
Be sure to pick up Be Glad Your Dad…(Is Not an Octopus!) which is out today!
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A Morning With Grandpa

by Sylvia Liu and Christina Forshay (Lee & Low, 2016)

Here’s a book I have been looking forward to for a long time, thanks to the close knit and dear friendships the book community creates online. It has been such fun to sneak peeks behind the scenes of both Sylvia and Christina’s work, and I am so happy to have them both on the blog today.

Christina’s color palette of dreamy pastels in the ground and sky meets the brightly hued flowers in the same way that Sylvia’s calm and serene Grandpa meets the bouncy energy of Mei Mei herself. The text and the art is gently and joyously matched, and it’s a beautiful story that spans generations and their peaceful mornings.

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First up, some questions for Sylvia:

Tell us a little about the story behind A MORNING WITH GRANDPA. Where did the idea come from and how did it evolve?

I got the idea when I was in Vermont on a family vacation watching my dad do qi gong and tai chi and teaching my daughters breathing techniques.

In my first draft, Gong Gong taught Mei Mei qi gong and tai chi, and she taught him how to make lemonade. My critique group gave me some great suggestions. Elaine Kiely Kearns suggested that Mei Mei teach him yoga instead. Reneé LaTulippe encouraged me to develop the lyrical language. I also got a professional critique from an agent through a Writer’s Digest course, and she suggested omitting the qi gong part to streamline the story.

After the story was accepted by Lee & Low, my editor Jessica Echeverría and I polished the manuscript for several months. We swapped out different poses, word-smithed every line, and went through about eleven drafts.

How does it feel to see your words gain another life with pictures?

I am humbled that Christina spent so much time bringing the story to life so beautifully. Before I saw her illustrations, I imagined the story could be illustrated in any number of ways, from a soft watercolor look to a bright, lively style. I’m so glad Lee & Low picked Christina, who really captured the essence of the story. Now I can’t imagine the story any other way. I am thrilled and in love with the pictures.

Who are some of your story heroes?

Those who do that magical thing with words and images that transport me to a different place like Shaun Tan (THE LOST THING, RULES OF SUMMER, and THE ARRIVAL are favorites), Neil Gaiman (SANDMAN series), and Diana Wynne Jones (HOWL’S MOVING CASTLE). Those who teach me something I didn’t know in a surprising visual way like Gene Luen Yang (BOXERS & SAINTS) and Max Brooks/Canaan White (THE HARLEM HELLFIGHTERS).

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And next up, Christina:

One thing that’s so interesting about your illustrations is their dynamic compositions. Can you talk a little about that and if you have any influences in film or TV? 

Yes, film and tv have a huge influence on me and my work! I’ve always been interested in how lighting, camera angle and staging creates drama and intrigue in a composition. As I got into high school, I took a film class and learned about how the composition of a scene can be symbolic and help evoke emotion in the viewer. I actually wrote a super long 15 page paper on the symbolism and drama Steven Spielberg and cinematographer Janusz Kaminski created in Schindler’s List. I was super into it!

Then in college while studying illustration, I took more film classes and a few storyboarding classes where I really learned about and practiced the art of composing dramatic scenes for television and film. I try to infuse what I learned in those classes in my illustrations as well.

What were your initial ideas for the art after you read the text, and how much did they evolve over the course of making the book?

When I read the manuscript for the first time, I remember being excited about Mei Mei’s spunky character. I knew she was going to be the driving force for keeping the compositions active. I had to figure out a way to balance her energetic spirit with Gong Gong’s calm and tranquil personality. I think one of the main themes of the story is how opposing energies can be symbiotic, so I knew I had to create scenes that showed the strengths of each of their personalities and how they mesh together.

When I was in the final stages of the art, I noticed most spreads actually stayed pretty similar to the initial sketches I turned in. There was a lot of refining of the look of characters over the course of the book, but in terms of staging and composition, the final art stayed very close to my original ideas. You can compare these images to see how the original small-scale thumbnail sketch evolved into the final art.

The very first thumbnail sketch (about 1″x 2″)  I turned in for one of the spreads along with the final image.

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Who are some of your story heroes?

My story heroes come from all forms of art: from music to art to writing. Bruce Springsteen is one of my favorite storytellers. All of his songs are stories and always contain a cast of characters. Also Brad Bird is an amazing storyteller. He wrote a short animation called “The Family Dog” which blew my mind when I was 10. It still blows my mind actually! From the kidlit world, there are so many storytellers whose work I admire: Jon Klassen, Adam Rex, Lizbeth Zwerger, Laurie Halse Anderson, and Jon Scieszka are a few from my long list of heroes. I am constantly looking for inspiration in new places!

A big thank you to Sylvia and Christina!

For more about this beautiful book and its creators, be sure to check out the rest of the stops on this blog tour. You can find all of the celebration here. cs

Sylvia Liu is an environmental lawyer turned children’s author and illustrator. A MORNING WITH GRANDPA is her debut picture book as an author. She is inspired by oceans, aliens, cephalopods, and more. She lives in Virginia Beach, Virginia, with her husband and their two daughters. Visit her online at enjoyingplanetearth.com.

Christina Forshay was born and raised in sunny California, where she lives with her amazing husband and the two cutest kids in the world! Of course, as a child she could be found drawing, coloring, and admiring her grand collection of crayons. Christina graduated from California State University Long Beach with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Illustration in 2002. Since then, she has been proudly working as an illustrator for the children’s market. Seriously, what could be more fun?!?

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The Bus Ride

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by Marianne Dubuc (Kids Can Press, 2015)

This delightful, mind-stretchy book is by the creator of one of my 2014 favorites, The Lion and the Bird. Remember that one?

And this book has been out for over a year, but it’s taken a while to wrap my brain around its brilliance.

It’s a little bit sweet and a little bit surreal.

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There’s our girl, a little Red of sorts. Waiting at the bus stop with her basket, on her way to visit her grandmother. Of course. And the book itself, a trim size perfect for a bus ride. A long stage for the passengers to be the stars of this show.

And red endpapers, of course.

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What’s so interesting (and challenging!) about this book is that the scene never changes. The bus stops and starts and new characters come and go, but the bus itself is the same.

Well that, and this sloth.

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This cat lady knits a scarf, a red one, that gets a teensy bit longer as the journey continues. That turtle hangs his head in boredom and the sloth sleeps.

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And on the wheels go, through a forest seen right through the windows.

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The turtle gets spooked by the tiny mole baby, and the sloth still sleeps.

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And when the bus goes into a tunnel, there’s a rumble-jumble on the bus. (According to the paper’s headline, which is a treat for any reader’s eagle eyes.) It’s a rumble-jumble that invites a prowler inside and bumps the sloth to another shoulder to sleep on.

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After the darkness, a pickpocketer. A big box. A sloth hug. A stop.

A grandma’s house.

This is a story about courage, everyday kindnesses, and adventures that are as simple as sharing shortbread cookies. I could get on that bus, couldn’t you?

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A Tree is Nice

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by Janice May Udry and pictures by Marc Simont (HarperCollins, 1987, originally published in 1956)

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I’ve always loved this girl. Hand on her hop, watering her tree. She’s totally oblivious to the rapscallions behind her, that dog and that cat. And even that tall tree back there. Her eyes hope only for this one.

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Do you see him there? The kid in the tshirt, looking up? Surely this text matches his thoughts exactly.

And what HarperCollins did here with the height of this book will not be lost on its readers. Long and tall and high, plenty of room for looking up. Plenty of height from which to hang dreams. Staircases of branches for swinging.

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And the pages. A swishing kind of breeze between the black and white spreads and the ones painted in color. A sleight of hand out in the open that slows you down to think. To remember. To watch.

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Your tree might be different than my tree. You might need it for a nap and I might need it for a climb. But we probably have the same wishes.

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A while back I wrote a piece for Marcie Flinchum Atkins’s blog, and if I’d had infinite time and space, this book would have been there too. This book planted a story seed of the best kind.

Dig a big hole. Plant your tree. Don’t forget the watering can.

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Apples and Robins

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by Lucie Félix (Chronicle Books, 2016)

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Here’s a book that is also a puzzle, an optical illusion, and a little bit toy-like all at once. Here’s what I mean.

So, then, a birdhouse: one small circle, two parallelograms, and a die-cut triangle.

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Or walls and a roof and a string, of course. Isn’t that what shapes are? Real, living, breathing things?

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But then wind blows and the sky rumbles, and . . .

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This book isn’t only clever cuts and shapes transforming into magic. It’s also a gentle arc of a pulsing spring. An apple, a reach, a bite, a worm.

A robin, a song, a home, a storm.

A mess, a basket, a watch, a wait.

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A winter, a spring.

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The Friendship Experiment meets A Rambler Steals Home

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The thing with publishing is that it’s always going to be easier (and more fun!) to navigate if you have some people by your side.

The thing with those people is that you didn’t know you would become friends, but you did.

I feel super lucky to have bumped into Erin Teagan along this road. We share a publisher and an editor and lots of the nitty gritties of this whole thing, and it’s been so wonderful to know her. She is smart and kind and has been the best encourager. And here’s the cover of her middle grade novel, The Friendship Experiment

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Don’t you love it? You can get it on November 1st, 2016!

I’m leaning on her every move because my book comes out a couple months later, in February of 2017. Have you seen its cover yet?

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And over the past year-ish, we’ve both been lucky enough to get to know many other debut middle grade authors. If you are looking to spruce up your shelves, this is a spectacular place to start.

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Friends stick together. Put Maddie and Derby in your get-to-know-and-read-and-love pile. We can’t wait for you to get to know them!

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Pink is for Blobfish

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by Jess Keating, illustrated by David Degrand (Knopf, 2016)

I mean, just look at that guy. How could you not love him? I do. I do, I do.

Making picture books means collaborating with the whispers of someone else’s art. And now that this particular book is off the printer and into the hands of readers, I got to eavesdrop on this conversation between Blobfish’s author and illustrator.

To Jess! And David!

JK: Hey guys! Hey Carter!

I’ve been really blown away by all of the love for my new book, Pink is for Blobfish! Working on this book was an incredible experience, and it’s so wonderful to see it reach the hands of young readers—thank you so much!

Today, I wanted you to meet one of the shining stars behind Blobfish! When I was writing this book, I couldn’t stop picturing what sort of illustration would accompany my (often bizarre) text. When my editor sent me David DeGrand’s take on our creatures, I was so thrilled! His work is hilarious, quirky, and a perfect match for the series. I’m jealous of his talent!

To celebrate David and his awesome work on this book, we got together for a virtual chat! I hope you enjoy it, and check him out online too! Without any adieu whatsoever, here we go!

Starting with a trip down memory lane, what inspired you to get into art and illustration?

DD: I started drawing cartoony illustrations and comic strips after my fifth grade art teacher assigned us to write and draw our own comic strip. I instantly fell in love with the process and so I kept writing and drawing my own comic strip that I would show my family and friends. It became on obsession and eventually a career, which I’m very fortunate for!

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JK: As a writer who is completely jealous of illustrators, I’d love to know more about your process. Can you take me through it? What happens after a manuscript like Pink is for Blobfish is sent your way?

DD: All illustration projects are a little bit different, so the process varies according to what the project entails. When I got the manuscript for Pink is for Blobfish, the first thing I did was look up as many reference photos as I could find for the different animals. I then started sketching different designs for each animal to try and find the funniest and silliest way to represent that animal in the book. It was a ton of fun!

JK: You get to pick one artist in history (alive or dead!) and have coffee with them. Who would you choose?

DD: This is really tough, but if I had to pick just one artist I would love to sit down and talk with Ed Emberley. His simple art instruction books were a big part of my childhood, so his influence has been with me as long as I can remember. But more importantly, I really admire and respect his point of view that drawing and creating should be accessible to everyone and that it shouldn’t be intimidating. He made it easy and fun for anyone to pick up a pencil and create a picture, regardless of your artistic background, and that’s something I have always admired and learned from.

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JK: A must-ask for all the kidlit writers reading this: what was your favorite children’s book growing up?

DD: Hands down it was Where the Wild Things Are, I must have read it every night for years. It started my obsession with monsters and all things strange and bizarre!

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JK: Killer journalism time: do you have any favorite snacks to munch on while you’re working? (I’m partial to popcorn.)

DD: I almost always have a bag of either almonds or pistachios on my drawing desk to munch on. I like to try and snack guilt free!

JK: Okay, time to share some DeGrand wisdom. Say a budding illustrator is reading this. What are the one or two best pieces of illustration advice that you would give them?

DD: The best advice I can give to someone wanting to be an illustrator is to simply draw what makes you happy. Sometimes I think artists can get caught up in trying to keep up with a popular artistic trend thinking that will help them in the business, but that’s not really being true to yourself. I think all artists should simply have fun with the creative process and by doing that your unique voice will always come through. When you’re enjoying what you’re creating, that joy will shine through and your art will find an audience.

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JK: You’re stranded on a deserted island. Which three books do you bring with you?

DD: The Complete Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson, Nightmare of Ecstasy by Rudolph Grey, and Robert Ebert’s Book of Film by Roger Ebert (I’m a huge movie geek!).

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JK: Lastly, when I was researching you online, I came across this photo. Readers need to know: what exactly is going on here and did you win the Showcase Showdown or what?

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DD: Oh yes, the moment I was almost famous! Here’s the story: I occasionally contribute cartoons and comics to the one and only MAD Magazine. One of the cartoons I did was a parody of The Price is Right. Drew Carey saw the cartoon and enjoyed it enough that he bought the original art from me! If that wasn’t enough, the producer for The Price is Right invited my wife and I out to LA and gave us a backstage tour and let us sit in the audience for a taping of the show. Right after the show I was able to meet Drew Carey very briefly and get the picture taken with him. It was all very surreal and amazing, to say the least!

Thank you so much, David! And a huge hug to you, Carter, for hosting us! We love ya!

(Anytime, pals. Blobfish friends are forever!)

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Ballet Cat + a giveaway!

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by Bob Shea (Disney-Hyperion, 2016)

This post is brought to you in partnership with Disney-Hyperion.

Can you look at these covers and not smile? Impossible. They w a m – p o w you with sparkles and awesome and confidence and an difficult-to-beat title like Dance! Dance! Underpants!

But beyond the glitter and brilliant character design, these are stories with a lot of heart. These are friendship stories that get right at the gut of telling the truth and not disappointing the people you love and the silly disaster of wearing goofy-looking underpants.

They are fun, they are fresh, and they are for young readers who deserve great books.

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I can’t read these without hearing Bob Shea’s voice, and you can too if you check this fun thing out:

And you’re in luck! The fine folks at Disney-Hyperion would like to give these two gems to you along with a plush Ballet Cat (who is so cute!) from MerryMakers, Inc.

All you have to do is comment here by midnight PST on Friday, February 12th.

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Bob Shea is the author of the first book about Ballet Cat: THE TOTALLY SECRET SECRET, the Dinosaur vs. series, and several other picture books, including DON’T PLAY WITH YOUR FOOD and UNICORN THINKS HE’S PRETTY GREAT. He and his wife have their own design studio in Madison, Connecticut.

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Ballet Cat and Sparkles the Pony are trying to decide what to play today. Nothing that Sparkles suggests–making crafts, playing checkers, and selling lemonade–goes well with the leaping, spinning, and twirling that Ballet Cat likes to do. When Sparkles’s leaps, spins, and twirls seem halfhearted, Ballet Cat asks him what’s wrong. Sparkles doesn’t want to say. He has a secret that Ballet Cat won’t want to hear. What Sparkles doesn’t know is that Ballet Cat has a secret of her own, a totally secret secret. Once their secrets are shared, will their friendship end, or be stronger than ever?

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Ballet Cat is getting her friend Butter Bear ready for her big ballet debut. “Leap, Butter Bear, leap!” Ballet Cat prompts. But Butter Bear would prefer to just point her toe. When Ballet Cat keeps pushing, Butter Bear gets hungry, then thirsty, then sleepy . . . The bottom line is that Butter Bear would rather do almost anything to avoid making a big leap. Why? Because her bottom is covered in silly underpants! This second entry in the Ballet Cat series will have beginning readers rolling on the floor with laughter.

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Giveaway open to US addresses only. Prizing and samples provided by Disney-Hyperion.

Little Red Sled: by Emily Arrow and Zoey Abbott Wagner

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There’s this songwriter, Emily Arrow. And there’s this illustrator, Zoey Abbott Wagner. And then there’s the internet, where these two collaborators met. Art showed up first, and the story followed, and they made this thing, this beautiful thing.

Music. A song. A story. A friendship, really.

Here’s what Emily had to say about it:

This is my debut video that is an original song and story! After seeing an illustration posted by one of my favorite up-and-coming illustrators, Zoey Abbot Wagner, a story concept flooded over me. With my ukulele in hand, I started imagining myself going out in the snow like the character in her sketch….but only wanting to deal with winter if I could have lots of books around! I shared the song with Zoey and she made the most beautiful, creative illustrations for our video project. We’ve had so much fun, we’re going to create a series of videos called “the Arrow of Seasons.” The characters will have season-y names and the stories will celebrate my two favorite things: music and literature. 

We love those things, right?

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Sometimes in picture books, this kind of collaboration is unusual. An in picture books, stories take years from idea to the printed page. But still, here’s one artist crafting half of a perfect thing, leaving room for the other artist’s half of the perfect thing.

Together, it sings. (Here, literally, but you know what I mean.)

I hope you’ll enjoy this duo as much as I have. Books and pictures…plus songs? Okay, yes.

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Here’s Emily Arrow and Zoey Abbott Wagner’s Little Red Sled:

And if you are a Los Angeles local, don’t miss Emily Arrow’s debut album release party at Once Upon a Time, on February 20th at 10:30 am. I’ll be there!

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